Cleaning Up Your Act: Key Determinants in Successful Spill Response

What words come to mind when you hear the word spill? Emergency, disaster, mistake, and dangerous may be among the first few, and there isn’t much to think about positively. However, with proper spill prevention preparation, no matter how big or small the event, the spill response can be cost and time-efficient. Nobody wants to believe their company could be the next victim of an environmental spill or release, but the unexpected is always possible. If your company has plans in place to mitigate potential threats, instill safety, and identify appropriate preparation from the beginning, it can reduce the possibility of an unfortunate spill event. WHAT IS THE FIRST STEP IN MITIGATING SPILLS? Make sure they don’t happen. I know, it sounds obvious. It is certainly easier said than done but preventing spills from happening is the best line of defense. One of the best ways to foster prevention strategies
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W&M Procures Closure After Pipeline Spill in South Texas

W&M conducted a site remediation involving the removal and disposal of approximately 100,000 cubic yards of impacted soil resulting from a pipeline gasoline release. The client’s objective was to remove all impacts to avoid possible long-term liabilities. 



How to Plan for (and Survive) an Unexpected Spill or Release

The thought of having a spill, release, overflow, or explosion at a facility is always in the back of our minds, but we never genuinely expect it to happen.  Despite the best precautions, accidents happen, systems fail, and employees and facilities need to be prepared.  Time is of the essence during the initial stage of a disaster, and the first 24 hours of the response can change the outcome of the project dramatically.  Are your employees trained and are your facilities outfitted for when that disaster occurs? Emergency response, spill response, and rapid response teams are critical pieces to be included in preparation for a potential spill or disaster. For oil and gas facilities, metal manufacturing facilities, and even food manufacturers, an unexpected spill or disaster could occur at any moment.  Several regulatory agencies govern spills or discharges in Texas and across the United States.  However, what they all have
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W&M Closes Coolant Spill Project

W&M provides environmental services, including spill and emergency response services for the Client. In May 2017, the Client contracted W&M to assist with the assessment and remediation of a coolant discharge that occurred at their manufacturing facility in Houston, Texas.  The Client’s objective was to remove all impacted on-Site soil and remediate and restore the adjacent drainage ditch efficiently and effectively.  W&M assisted the Client with the development of a Sampling Analysis Plan (SAP) that would meet the requirements of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the City of Houston (COH) Stormwater Quality Enforcement Section.



W&M Closes Contaminated Houston Site Through MSD

W&M conducted a soil removal response action for a contaminated property and detected total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the C12-C28 boiling point range at concentrations in exceedance of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Texas Risk Reduction Program (TRRP) residential assessment level (RAL).



Contaminated Site Closure Strategies


  • Contaminated Site Closure Strategies
    July 25, 2019
    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Unanticipated contamination of soil or groundwater can be detected during investigations conducted as part of property transactions or the refinancing process, or in response to recognized environmental conditions (RECs) identified during Phase I Environmental Site Assessments.  Although the initial reactions to this information can be distressing, partnering with a qualified environmental firm that is familiar (more…)

Venue:  

Address:
Streaming From, Plano, Texas, 75074, United States





Soil and Groundwater Remediation Technology Selection


  • Soil and Groundwater Remediation Technology Selection
    May 30, 2019
    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Join us on May 30, 2019 for our Soil and Groundwater Remediation Technology Selection webinar. David McAlister will discuss how specific conditions and motivations surrounding a soil and groundwater remediation project can affect the technology selection process. A wide range of technologies for soil and groundwater remediation exist, but a combination of multiple technologies or (more…)

Venue:  

Address:
Streaming From, Plano, Texas, 75074, United States





It’s Like Groundhog Day All Over Again!

 In honor of Groundhog Day this February, I’m going to describe a “normal” trip that I take on a semi-regular basis.  I received a call from a relatively small manufacturer that was having some environmental issues and received W&M’s name from a contractor that they use.  They asked if I’d come out to take a look.  I happily obliged. Most facilities I visit have many similarities and this facility wasn’t an exception.  On the grounds are a couple of big steel buildings, substantial amounts of concrete in the front, and the rear of the property is largely bare ground.  The steel buildings usually have a crane or two; there is equipment manufactured for oil and gas, shipyards, off-shore platforms, or pipeline facilities.  Some facilities make items for all of these types of industries while some only make items for a single industry. On a typical visit, the same thing happens:
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Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen?

Keeping your project on track when you have stakeholder involvement You’re an environmental manager for your company, and you learn that a contractor doing repair work has caused a release from one of your pipelines which is located on private property.  You report the spill to the authorities, notify the landowner, and initiate cleanup activities.  The contractor files a claim with their insurance carrier. Following initial response actions, soil and groundwater is investigated and cleanup goals are established.  It sounds straightforward until the various stakeholders get involved.  The stakeholders include the construction contractor, their insurance company, the insurance company’s consultant, the regulatory agency, and the landowner, in addition to you and your environmental consultant.  All parties want the spill cleaned up but have different goals and objectives. In another case, no one knows exactly when the spill, or multiple spills, occurred, but the cleanup has been underway for years. Initial
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Remediation and VCP Closure of Gun Range

The Tri-City Firing Range, located in Plano, Texas (Site), has been utilized for police officer training purposes since its construction in the 1980s. Lead was identified in the soil on the property and sediments of an adjacent creek bed. W&M entered the Site into the TCEQ VCP, conducted soil and groundwater sampling to delineate the impact, developed the required VCP documents, completed limited soil excavation and off-Site disposal, and received final closure through the VCP.

On-Site sampling identified shallow surface soil impacts and only limited impacts to the sediment in the creek. No groundwater impact was identified at the Site. Once the Site was delineated, W&M developed a Response Action Plan (RAP) that was approved by the TCEQ and quickly completed by excavation and off-Site diposal. W&M determined that the Site could be closed under Remedy Standard A with and alternative cleanup level utilizing a transport model to verify determine a Tier 2 Protective concentration Level and thereby increasing the cleanup level from 15 mg/kg (State background for soil lead) to 500 mg/kg. This process allowed W&M to perform less remediation and, thereby, substantially decrease the remediation costs associated with this project. The project was completed on-schedule and on-budget even when additional tasks were requested by the City of Plano.