W&M obtains MSD and VCP Closure for Laboratory Property

W&M obtained a Certificate of Completion through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP) at a groundwater contamination site which required risk-based assessment of soil, groundwater, surface water, sediment, and soil vapor; chemical and biological groundwater remediation; and a restriction on potable groundwater use through a Municipal Setting Designation (MSD).



Chemical Vapor Mitigation in Texas – An Update

The migration of chemical vapors from subsurface contamination into buildings has become an increasingly urgent topic for many Texas property owners. Vapor Intrusion (VI) is defined as the movement of volatile chemical vapors from contaminated soil or groundwater into nearby buildings.  VI sometimes gets confused with Vapor Encroachment, which is the presence or likely presence of volatile chemical vapors in the vadose zone on a property.  For instance, a vacant property could have vapor encroachment arising from a contaminant plume migrating from another property, but not vapor intrusion (due to the lack of a building).  Recent emphasis by the lending industry and by TCEQ coupled with a general awareness of VI is mostly responsible for the urgency. The TCEQ in several recent vapor encroachment cases has required responsible parties to conduct VI assessments. Unfortunately, there are no specific TCEQ rules or guidance regarding VI assessments, however, ASTM E2600-15[i] provides a
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Vapor Investigation

Vapor intrusion is the presence of potentially toxic vapors in a structure that arise from contaminated groundwater or soil below (or near) a building. It can lead to health problems as well as legal exposure. If you are a real estate developer and haven’t yet dealt with vapor intrusion, chances are you will soon, particularly at properties in urban areas. In recent years, evolution of the environmental due diligence process and requirements of savvy lenders have resulted in a greater awareness of the potential for vapor intrusion, and in some instances the need for mitigation.





Clearing the Air: What You Need To Know About Vapor Intrusion

Vapor intrusion is the presence of potentially toxic vapors in a structure that arise from contaminated groundwater or soil below (or near) a building.  It can lead to health problems as well as legal exposure. If you are a real estate developer and haven’t yet dealt with vapor intrusion, chances are you will soon, particularly at properties in urban areas.  In recent years, evolution of the environmental due diligence process and requirements of savvy lenders have resulted in a greater awareness of the potential for vapor intrusion, and in some instances the need for mitigation.   Frank Clark, P.E., has written a white paper explaining what vapor intrusion is and also how it can affect your building, property, and most importantly, your health. Increasingly, as the real estate industry becomes more aware of the issues and individual States adopt regulations, vapor intrusion will become a concern for developers, builders and lenders. 
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Frank Clark’s Vapor Intrusion Webinar

If you missed the webinar that Frank Clark hosted on Vapor Intrusion last Thursday we have got you covered.  Because we know how schedules can get extremely hectic we recorded the webinar so you can view it at your convenience.  Frank discussed how to evaluate and remedy vapor intrusion in buildings. Frank Clark, P.E., P.G. has his Master’s degree in Civil Engineering from MIT. He has been the Project Manager or Principal-in-charge of over 1500 environmental and geotechnical engineering projects throughout the northeast and southwestern United States and in Europe. To watch Frank explain what vapor intrusion is and describe some available remedial solutions. If you would like a copy of the slides of his presentation, please email Lance French.





W&M Installs New Vapor Assessment Devices

In February, W&M assisted an industrial client in the evaluation of potential vapor intrusion into one of their buildings.  The assessment initially involved screening of areas with a sensitive photoionization detector (PID) to assess potential sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) identified in air.  Based on the screening, it was recommended that the sub-slab vapors be evaluated to determine potential sources for the detected VOCs. Multiple sub-slab samples will be obtained using Vapor Pin™ sampling equipment manufactured by Cox Colvin & Associates, Inc. of Plain City, OH.  The Vapor Pin™ is a stainless steel or brass machined pin set in a Teflon sleeve that is hammered into a pre-drilled hole in the slab.  The Vapor Pin™ can be capped and allowed to remain discretely in place for future sampling events.  The exciting aspect about installing a Vapor Pin™ system is how quickly it can be installed, resulting in a number
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